top of page
58 East Anglia Way Great Yarmouth.jpg
Change of Use Planning Application approved for a new residential unit in Norwich, Norfolk. En-Plan: Planning Consultants for Norfolk, Norwich, Wolverhampton, Oswestry and Shropsire.

NEW EXTENSION APPROVED.
GORLERSTON, NORFOLK

East Anglia Way, Great Yarmouth, Norfolk.

 

Proposed Development: Single-storey rear extension

Gorleston is a coastal town in the county of Norfolk, England. It is situated at the mouth of the River Yare, just south of the larger town of Great Yarmouth. Gorleston has a long history as a fishing port and seaside resort, with sandy beaches and traditional seaside amenities. It is also known for its scenic cliffs and coastal walks. The town has a mix of residential areas, shops, and recreational facilities, making it a popular destination for tourists and residents alike.

Gorleston has a rich history dating back many centuries. The area around Gorleston has been inhabited since ancient times. Archaeological evidence suggests human presence dating back to the Bronze Age. Gorleston's history as a settlement is closely tied to its position as a port. During the medieval period, it was an important fishing village and trading port, particularly known for its herring industry. Gorleston continued to flourish as a port town, benefiting from its strategic location on the Norfolk coast. It traded goods such as fish, wool, and grain with other ports in England and Europe. Throughout its history, Gorleston has maintained strong maritime connections. It was involved in shipbuilding and coastal trade, contributing to its economic prosperity. The development of the railway in the 19th century further boosted Gorleston's growth as a seaside resort. Tourists began to visit the area attracted by its sandy beaches and seaside attractions. Gorleston continued to evolve as a popular holiday destination, with the construction of promenades, hotels, and entertainment venues. It also played a role during World War II, with its port facilities used for military purposes. In recent decades, Gorleston has faced challenges typical of many British seaside towns, including changes in tourism trends and economic shifts. However, efforts have been made to preserve its heritage and enhance its appeal as a destination for visitors and residents.

The spatial profile of Gorleston, like any town, is characterized by its layout, land use patterns, infrastructure, and amenities. Here's a general overview of the spatial profile of Gorleston:

  1. Residential Areas: Gorleston consists of various residential neighborhoods, ranging from historic streets with Victorian and Edwardian houses to newer developments with modern homes. These neighborhoods offer a mix of housing types, including detached houses, semi-detached houses, terraced houses, and apartments.

  2. Town Center: Gorleston has a town center that serves as a hub for commercial and social activities. Here, you'll find a range of shops, restaurants, cafes, and services catering to the local community and visitors.

  3. Coastal Area: Being a coastal town, Gorleston is defined by its proximity to the sea. The coastal area features sandy beaches, promenades, and recreational facilities, making it a popular destination for residents and tourists alike.

  4. Green Spaces: Gorleston is home to several parks and green spaces, providing opportunities for outdoor recreation and relaxation. These green areas contribute to the town's aesthetic appeal and quality of life.

  5. Transportation Infrastructure: Gorleston is well-connected by road, with major routes providing access to neighboring towns and cities. Public transportation, including buses, serves the area, providing links to nearby urban centers and rural areas.

  6. Educational and Healthcare Facilities: The town is served by schools, colleges, and healthcare facilities, ensuring access to education and medical services for residents.

  7. Cultural and Recreational Amenities: Gorleston offers various cultural and recreational amenities, such as theaters, community centers, sports facilities, and libraries, enriching the social fabric of the town.

  8. Industrial and Commercial Areas: While primarily residential, Gorleston also has industrial and commercial zones, accommodating businesses ranging from small enterprises to larger industrial facilities.

Overall, Gorleston's spatial profile reflects its status as a coastal town with a mix of residential, commercial, recreational, and cultural elements, providing a diverse and vibrant environment for its residents.

The applicants wanted to replace the conservatory with a modern extension so they could use the new floor space all year round and save on heating bills in the long run.  The amount of heat lost through a conservatory can vary depending on several factors, including the design of the conservatory, the materials used, the insulation level, and the outside temperature. Here are some common factors that contribute to heat loss in conservatories:

  1. Glazing Type: Single-pane glass conservatories typically lose more heat compared to double or triple glazing, which provide better insulation.

  2. Insulation: Proper insulation, including the roof, walls, and floor, helps reduce heat loss. Without adequate insulation, heat can easily escape through these areas.

  3. Ventilation: Poorly sealed doors, windows, and ventilation gaps can lead to heat loss. Proper seals and ventilation control can minimize this.

  4. Orientation: The orientation of the conservatory (e.g., north-facing, south-facing) can affect heat loss. South-facing conservatories receive more sunlight and can retain heat better during the day, while north-facing ones may lose more heat.

  5. Heating System: The type of heating system used in the conservatory, such as radiators, underfloor heating, or electric heaters, can impact heat retention.

  6. Usage: How the conservatory is used and whether it's heated regularly also affects heat loss. If the conservatory is used frequently and heated, it will retain more heat compared to one that is seldom used or not heated.

  7. External Temperature: External temperature fluctuations influence the rate of heat loss. During colder periods, more heat is lost through the conservatory compared to warmer seasons.

To quantify the exact amount of heat lost through a conservatory, you would need to consider all these factors and may need to conduct specific measurements or assessments based on the individual characteristics of the conservatory in question.

The amount of money saved by having a well-insulated extension compared to a conservatory can vary widely depending on various factors such as the size of the extension, the level of insulation, local climate conditions, energy prices, and how the space is used. However, generally speaking, a well-insulated extension is likely to provide greater energy efficiency and cost savings compared to a conservatory for several reasons:

  1. Improved Energy Efficiency: A well-insulated extension will better retain heat in the winter and keep the space cooler in the summer, reducing the need for heating and cooling compared to a conservatory, which tends to be less energy-efficient due to its large glass surfaces.

  2. Reduced Heating Costs: With better insulation, less heat is lost through the walls, roof, and floor of the extension, resulting in lower heating bills during colder months.

  3. Lower Cooling Costs: Similarly, during warmer months, a well-insulated extension will require less energy for cooling compared to a conservatory, which can heat up quickly due to its extensive glazing.

  4. Year-Round Usability: Unlike conservatories, which may be uncomfortable to use in extreme temperatures, a well-insulated extension can be comfortably used year-round, potentially increasing the overall value and utility of the property.

  5. Long-Term Savings: While the initial cost of constructing a well-insulated extension may be higher than building a conservatory, the energy savings over time can offset this initial investment, resulting in long-term financial benefits.

It's difficult to provide an exact monetary figure for the potential savings without knowing specific details about the extension and conservatory in question, as well as local energy prices and usage patterns. However, in many cases, the savings from reduced energy consumption and increased comfort provided by a well-insulated extension can be significant over the long term. Consulting with a qualified energy assessor or contractor can help provide a more accurate estimate based on your individual circumstances.

The application site is a mid terrace house on the western side of a cul de sac on the north side of
the main road into the estate. The front elevation of the house faces east, there is an existing
conservatory at the rear of the house in the area where the extension is to be built.
The proposal is to remove the conservatory and build a brick extension 4.9m wide and extending out
by 4.1m, the extension will have a mono-pitched roof with a tiled finish to match the existing house
roof.
No objections have been received to the proposal.

Policies:
Assessment:
Conclusion & Recommendation:
HOU18
Policy:
HOU18 Housing (Existing dwelllings - Extensions & Alterations)
POLICY HOU18
EXTENSIONS AND ALTERATIONS TO DWELLINGS WILL BE PERMITTED WHERE THE
PROPOSAL:
(a) IS IN KEEPING WITH THE DESIGN OF THE EXISTING DWELLING AND THE CHARACTER
OF THE AREA;
(b) WOULD NOT SIGNIFICANTLY AFFECT THE AMENITIES OF ANY NEIGHBOURING
DWELLING; AND,
(c) WOULD NOT RESULT IN OVER-DEVELOPMENT OF THE SITE.

The extension will be to the north side of the rear elevation and will be approximately half the width of the rear elevation. The nearest neighbour to the north (no. 56) has a conservatory close to the boundary which has obscure glass to the side elevation facing the site, the ground level of that  property is slightly lower than the application site.


The extension will have a brick wall facing the neighbour and will be taller than the existing conservatory so will cause some loss of light to the neighbouring conservatory during part of the day but the effect is unlikely to be significant enough to justify refusal of the application. The design is in keeping with the house and the extension will not be an over development of the property. APPROVE - the proposal complies with Policy HOU18 of the Great Yarmouth Borough-Wide LocalPlan.

 

Application Ref: 06/14/0804/F

Contact us

Thanks for submitting!

Shropshire Office

Missenden

Back Lane

Bomere Heath

Shropshire

SY4 3PH

Norfolk Office

34 Queen Elizabeth Avenue

Kings Lynn

Norfolk

PE30 4BX

En-Plan: Planning & Architectue Chartered Planning Consultants Chartered Town Planning Consultants

FOLLOW US:

  • Facebook Social Icon
  • YouTube Social  Icon
  • Pinterest Social Icon
  • Instagram Social Icon
LinkedIn.png
yell.com En-Plan: Planning & Architectue Chartered Planning Consultants Chartered Town Planning Consultants

REGISTERED ADDRESS: MISSENDEN, BACK LANE, BOMERE HEATH, SHREWSBURY, SHROPSHIRE, SY4 3PH.

CERTIFICATE NUMBER 05274947

INCORPORATED ON 1st NOVEMBER 2004

CHARTERED PLANNING & ARCHITECTURAL CONSULTANCY

En-Plan: Planning & Architecture, Planning Consultants
bottom of page