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New bungalow approved in Necton, Norfolk.

RESIDENTIAL UNIT APPROVED.
NECTON, NORFOLK

Tunns Lane, Necton, Norfolk.

 

Proposed Development: New residential unit in the Necton Conservation Area.

Following the initial discussion wit the applicant a two-storey side extension was agreed on whereby the size of the house would be doubled and two new bedrooms added at first floor to accommodate a growing family.

The application site way is located in the Conservation Area for Necton has All Saint's church at its heart and includes Church Farm and a couple of cottages to its north, the rectory and dwellings along School Road to its east and south and a graveyard, Eastgate Farm and some dwellings to its west and south along the western side of Tuns Road. Nos. 4 to 12 School Road are part of a wider row of terraced houses (nos. 2 to 16 School Road), the western end of which used to be the Post Office and has since been converted into a dwelling (no. 2). There are a mix of building forms with linear development along School and Tuns Road and a number of backland developments. Behind the old Post Office (which faces School Road and is at its junction with Tuns Road) is an old long red brick barn that has a dual pitched clay pantile roof with black painted timber gable ends. This adjoins the western side boundary with Tuns Road. Within 12m of the proposed development is an apple tree within the application site which would be on the eastern side of the proposed dwelling; a poplar tree on the land belonging to no. 2 School Road which is adjacent the boundary with the existing access that would be used for the new dwelling and; two ash trees on the land belonging to no. 14 School Road which are adjacent the boundary with the existing garage that would be used for the new dwelling.


The application proposes the subdivision and grouping of five rear gardens (belonging to nos. 4 to 12 School Road) for the erection of a new single storey dwelling. The application site also includes an existing concrete drive with garage situated behind nos. 2 to 16 School Road. It has access onto Tuns Road. The drive is to be brick weave. The new dwelling is to have a dual pitched roof with gable ends and its principal elevation is to face south. It is to measure approximately 11.5m in width by 6.3m in depth by 2. 7m in height to the eaves and 4.6m in height to the ridge. It is to include an entrance hall, kitchen, utility room, lounge-diner, 2x bedrooms and a bathroom. The dwelling is to be finished with red brick for the walls, red clay tiles for the roof, UPVC for the windows and hardwood for the doors. The dwelling is to be situated approximately 5.5m away from the proposed northern rear boundary to allow for a private rear garden, 1.25m away from the western side boundary, 7.5m away from the eastern side boundary to allow for a vehicular turning space and 5.15m away from the southern boundary (with the existing drive inbetween the dwelling and the southern boundary). A single apple tree would be removed as part of the development and a new one planted.

Necton itself is a rural village and civil parish located in the Breckland district of Norfolk, England. The name "Necton" is believed to have originated from the Old English words "neowe" and "tun," meaning "new farmstead" or "new settlement."

The history of Necton can be traced back to the Anglo-Saxon period. It was mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086, a survey commissioned by William the Conqueror, where it was recorded as "Neuetuna." During this time, Necton was primarily an agricultural community, with a population of around 35 households.

In the medieval period, Necton had close connections to the Church. The parish church of All Saints, which still stands today, dates back to the 13th century and exhibits Norman and Gothic architectural features. The church played a central role in the religious and social life of the village.

Throughout its history, Necton remained a predominantly agricultural community. The village's economy revolved around farming, with the cultivation of crops such as wheat, barley, and oats, as well as livestock rearing.

In the 19th century, the arrival of the railway had a significant impact on Necton. The Swaffham to King's Lynn railway line opened in 1847, passing through the village. This facilitated transportation of goods and people, stimulating the local economy and allowing for increased trade and connectivity.

During World War II, Necton, like many other rural areas in Norfolk, played its part in the war effort. The nearby RAF Swanton Morley airfield was used by the Royal Air Force as a base for bomber operations. The village experienced some minor damage from bombing raids, but fortunately, there were no major incidents.

In more recent years, Necton has evolved into a residential area, with a mix of historic and modern housing developments. The village maintains its rural character and attracts residents seeking a peaceful countryside lifestyle.

Today, Necton continues to be a thriving community with various amenities, including a primary school, shops, a pub, and community organizations. The village's rich history, scenic surroundings, and convenient location make it an attractive place to live and visit.

The application site is located in a designated Conservation Area and the whole legal framework for these areas was The Civic Amenities Act 1967  that played a crucial role in the establishment and development of conservation areas in the United Kingdom. The Act introduced the concept of conservation areas and provided a legal framework for their designation and protection.

 

The Civic Amenities Act 1967 aimed to address concerns about the loss of historic buildings and the degradation of areas with special architectural or historic interest. It empowered local authorities to designate conservation areas within their jurisdictions to preserve and enhance their character and appearance.

The Act outlined the criteria for designation, stating that an area could be designated as a conservation area if it possessed special architectural or historic interest, the character or appearance of which it was desirable to preserve or enhance. Once designated, conservation areas would benefit from additional planning controls and regulations to protect their distinctive features.

Since the enactment of the Civic Amenities Act 1967, subsequent legislation and regulations have further refined and expanded the framework for conservation areas. The Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) Act 1990, for example, introduced additional provisions for the protection and management of conservation areas.

Today, local authorities in the UK continue to identify and designate conservation areas based on their architectural, historic, or environmental significance. Conservation area status helps to safeguard the unique character and heritage of these areas by requiring special consideration for any proposed development or alterations that could affect their appearance or character.

It's worth noting that while the Civic Amenities Act 1967 provided the initial framework for conservation area designation, specific processes and guidelines may vary across different local authorities in the UK. Therefore, for information on the conservation areas in a particular location, it is advisable to consult the relevant local planning authority or conservation officers who can provide accurate and up-to-date details regarding conservation areas within their jurisdiction.

Living in a conservation area can have both positive and potentially restrictive effects. Here are some common effects associated with living in a conservation area:

  1. Preservation of Character: Conservation areas aim to protect and preserve the architectural, historical, or environmental character of an area. This can contribute to a unique sense of place and enhance the overall aesthetic appeal of the neighborhood.

  2. Planning Controls: Conservation areas are subject to stricter planning regulations and controls. Any proposed changes or developments within the area may require special consent or approval from the local planning authority. This helps ensure that alterations or new constructions are in harmony with the area's character and do not negatively impact its heritage.

  3. Property Restrictions: Living in a conservation area may entail certain restrictions on property modifications. These can include limitations on external alterations, restrictions on the use of certain materials, or guidelines on the design and appearance of new developments. Homeowners may need to obtain planning permission or adhere to specific guidelines when making changes to their properties.

  4. Increased Value: Conservation areas are often considered desirable places to live due to their unique charm and architectural significance. As a result, property values in these areas may be higher compared to surrounding areas. The preservation of character and architectural heritage can contribute to long-term property value appreciation.

  5. Sense of Community: Conservation areas often foster a strong sense of community pride and engagement. Residents may actively participate in preservation efforts, community events, and local initiatives aimed at maintaining and celebrating the area's character and heritage.

  6. Limited Amenities: In some cases, conservation areas may have restrictions on certain types of development or commercial activities. This can limit the availability of certain amenities or services within the immediate vicinity. However, this is not always the case and can vary depending on the specific conservation area.

 

It's important to note that the effects of living in a conservation area can vary depending on the specific designation, local regulations, and individual circumstances. It is advisable for residents to familiarize themselves with the specific guidelines and planning regulations applicable to their conservation area and consult with local authorities or conservation officers for accurate and up-to-date information.

The Planning Application

The application proposed the subdivision and grouping of five rear gardens (belonging to nos. 4 to 12 School Road) for the erection of a new single storey dwelling. The original application was revised by reducing the scale and changing the design of the dwelling at the request of the Council. The revised scheme has been considered with regard to the comments of the Parish Council, Highway Authority, Historic Buildings Consultant, Contaminated Land Officer, Tree and Countryside Consultant, the representations made in objection and the policies of the LDF and NPPF as noted above. The principle of development is set by the fact that the site is inside the limit of the defined settlement boundary for Necton which is a service centre village.

It was considered that it is unlikely that the development will have unacceptable effects on the amenities of the area or the residential amenity of neighbouring occupants or future occupants of the development site. In coming to this conclusion particular account has been taken of the following considerations. The dwelling would not cause overlooking or privacy loss to neighbouring properties given it would be a single storey and the boundaries would be screened. However, more detail of boundary screening was required, especially with regard to the screening of the proposed northern rear boundary. Therefore the planning permission would be subject to a pre-commencement condition requiring a plan indicating the positions, design, materials and type of boundary screening to be erected and a timetable of its construction. Furthermore, to prevent future development from causing overlooking and privacy loss to the neighbouring properties. planning permission was subject to the condition that the permitted development right to alter the roof is removed.


The dwelling would not cause significant overshadowing of neighbouring properties given its distance from the northern, eastern and southern boundaries relative to its height. Although close to the western side boundary, which would cause some degree of overshadowing to the neighbouring property (no. 2) on that side during the morning; the affected area is not the immediate garden area.


The dwelling would not have an adverse impact upon the visual appearance of the area given it would be behind the resdential curtilage of no. 2 School Road in relation to Tuns Road with the only visible part of the dwelling from Tuns Road being the portion of the gable end above the boundary fence. The future occupants of the dwelling will have a small private amenity space to the rear given the distance of the dwelling from the northern rear boundary (approximately 5.5m) and will have little amenity space to the front given the distance of the dwelling from the drive (approximatley 1.5m). In order to maintain an acceptable amount of private amenity space in perpetuity and to ensure any future development does not encroach the drive way, planning permission should be subject to the condition that permitted development rights for extensions, porches and ancillary buildings

As aforementioned, a single apple tree would be removed as part of the development and a new one planted. Furthermore, there are three other trees within 12m of the proposed development which will be retained (1x poplar and 2x ash). The Tree and Countryside Consultant advises that planning permission should be subject to the condition that operations on site shall take place in complete accordance with the Arboricultural Impact Assessment, Tree Protection Plan and Arboricultural Method Statement; tree protection works and any pre-emptive tree works required must be carried out and tree protection barriers put in place prior to the commencement of other operations in connection with the development and; protective fencing must be retained until all site works have been completed and all equipment, machinery and surplus materials have been removed.

It was considered that the development achieves an acceptable standard of design. In coming to this conclusion particular account has been taken of the following considerations. As aforementioned, there is a mix of built forms in the area with linear development along School and Tuns Road and a number of backland developments. There is an old long red brick barn that has a dual pitched clay pantile roof with black painted timber gable ends behind no. 2 School Road which adjoins the western side boundary with Tuns Road. Considering the existence of this barn behind no. 2 School Road, the principle of a building behind mos. 4 to 12 School Road, albeit for a dwelling rather than an outbuilding, would not be out of keeping with the built form of the area. Although the new dwelling would face the side elevation of no. 19 Tuns Road, it would be backland development and is not part of the immediate street-scene. The proposed dwelling would be of a similar form to the barn behind no. 2 School Road with a dual pitched roof and gable ends albeit would be built across the rear gardens of nos. 4 to 12 School Road rather than along. The proposed dwelling would relate well to its surroundings given its modest height and scale. The proposed layout would make the best use of the application site in terms of its appearance and function given it is backland development and does not need to relate to Tuns Road and given it relates to the existing drive way and garage.

The application form states that the dwelling is to be finished with red brick for the walls, red clay tiles for the roof, UPVC for the windows and hardwood for the doors. However, as the dwelling would be within the Conservation Area, concrete tiles for the roof and UPVC for the windows would be inappropriate. Therefore planning permission should be subject to the condition that clay pantiles are used for the roof and timber is used for the windows and doors, although the type and colour of clay pantile and details of the timber windows and doors must be agreed prior to commencement of development on the site. Furthermore, planning permission should be subject to the condition that precise details of the external brickwork and bond is agreed prior to commencement of development on the site.

New development is expected to preserve or enhance the character, appearance and setting of Conservation Areas. The character of the area is defined by the mixture and style of buildings, the quality and relationship of buildings, prevalent building materials and the amount of trees. The proposed dwelling would be of a similar form to the barn behind no. 2 School Road with a dual pitched roof and gable ends.

The Conservation Area includes a mixed built form with linear development along School Road and Tuns Road and backland development around Eastgate Farm House. The existence of the old long red brick barn behind no. 2 School Road establishes the principle of a building behind nos. 4 to 12 School Road albeit the appliation is for a dwelling rather than an outbuilding. Although the new dwelling would face the side elevation of no. 19 Tuns Road, it would be backland development and is not part of the immediate street-scene.
To ensure the proposed dwelling is finished with materials suitable within the Conservation Area, planning permission should be subject to the aforementioned materials conditions.
No trees with any significance to the Conservation Area will be lost to enable the proposed development.


The Highway Authority has no concerns with the utilisation of the existing vehicular access onto Tunns Road, however, they are aware that there is a level difference which requires vehicles to step up when crossing the footway to gain access into the site. The Highway Authority therefore suggest that planning permission is subject to the condition that the concrete area to the rear of the footway is re-graded to remove this level difference. There is a telegraph pole which is currently positioned to the south of the access. The Highway Authority would prefer the relocation of this pole but given the width of the access and the fact it is an existing facility, the highway authority do not insist on this. With regard to the proposed site layout, the Highway Authority is satisfied that there is sufficient room on site to cater for 2 cars to park (to accord with the adopted parking strategy). With regard to the turning facility, the Highway Authority has no objection to this being provided. It is suggested that, given the length of the driveway shown, it is likely that vehicles may in fact park side by side (to the front of the plot) and reverse out onto Tuns Road. However, given Tuns Road has the characteristics of a street, the Highway Authority would not object if turning facilities were not provided.
To ensure the availability of the parking / manoeuvring area for future occupants, the Highway Authority also advise planning permission should be subject to the condition that the proposed access / on-site car parking / turning area must be laid out, demarcated, levelled, surfaced and drained prior to the first occupation of the development and thereafter retained.

Accordingly, the proposed development is considered to be acceptable in planning terms and, subject to conditions ensuring acceptable materials and the protection of amenity, highway safety and trees, is therefore recommended for approval, and a syou can see has been completed.

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